If you care about hunger, eat less meat

Over the last 3 years the cost of basic food has risen by an average of 83% worldwide. This dramatic increase is partly related to agricultural plots being used for the supply of the booming bio fuels energy market. Rising costs os staples such as rice and wheat have led to unrest and violent protests in some 37 countries, from Egypt and Ethiopia to the Philippines and Indonesia. In Haiti, thousands of demonstrators erected street barricades, demolished shops and forced the prime minister to resign. At least 5 people were killed, as were 24 in riots in Camerooon.

 

Following Dominique Strauss-Kahn, Director of the International Monetary Fund and Robert Zoellick from the World Bank, Pascal Lamy, Director General of WTO also issued a stark warning and called for a reorientation of development policies towards a focussed support of local agriculture.

 

Concerning the larger picture of the crisis I found an interesting article by Guardian columnist and author George Monbiot (via culturematters). Quoting the World Bank he points out that “the grain required to fill the tank of a sports utility vehicle with ethanol … could feed one person for a year”. Read against the background of new environmental energy policies, such as Britains Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation, which obliges sellers of transport fuels to mix it with ethanol or biodiesel made from crops, it becomes obvious what a highly sensitive balance needs to be found between environmental, energy and food strategies.

 

But Monbiot also points to another cause of the current food crisis: While this year 100 million tonnes of foodstuff will feed cars, 760 (!!!) million tonnes will be snatched from the mouths of humans to feed animals. With more and more of the world population developing a craving for meat, Monbiot reaches the conclusion that: “If you care about hunger, eat less meat.”

4 Responses to “If you care about hunger, eat less meat”


  1. 1 Hannelore Knott May 1, 2008 at 5:55 pm

    Read more about the world food crisis, there are two related articles published in THE ECONOMIST, April 19th 2008:

    The silent tsunami

    http://www.economist.com/opinion/displaystory.cfm?story_id=11050146&CFID=3724165&CFTOKEN=94090626

    The new face of hunger

    http://www.economist.com/world/international/displaystory.cfm?story_id=11049284

  2. 2 hknott May 6, 2008 at 6:27 pm

    There are two related articles published in THE ECONOMIST, April 19th 2008, worthwhile to read:

    The silent tsunami
    http://www.economist.com/opinion/displaystory.cfm?story_id=11050146&CFID=3724165&CFTOKEN=94090626

    The new face of hunger
    http://www.economist.com/world/international/displaystory.cfm?story_id=11049284

  3. 3 Third Tone Devil May 7, 2008 at 1:59 am

    It’s been pointed out for a long time that biofuels are not just reducing the acreage used for foodstuffs, but also are responsible for much of the destruction of the Amazon rainforest. The other main cause for that is, of course, the soaring consumption of everything — in this case particularly soy — in China. I wonder if a similar argument to pollution will be made: China should learn from the mistakes of the West and reduce meat consumption??

    Another casualty to rising food prices may be organic farming, which is much more extensive (i.e. uses much more land for the same output) than farming with pesticides.

    On the positive side, I have long been thinking that Europe’s future is as an exporter of agricultural goods (as well as lifestyle). I can imagine that in a relatively short time, Europe will undergo an agricultural revival at a number of levels (both large-scale and “boutique”).

  4. 4 Reweave June 19, 2008 at 11:45 am

    Somehow i missed the point. Probably lost in translation🙂 Anyway … nice blog to visit.

    cheers, Reweave!!


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